Research: Anti-Poverty Strategies: An Investigation of Northern Nigeria

Poverty and poverty reduction are prominent topics of discussion at international development meetings. Despite the existence of both private and public initiatives to combat it, over 1 billion people still live in extreme poverty, about half of whom are in sub-Saharan African countries (MDG, 2015). Poverty Global Practice, a poverty policy monitoring and evaluation unit of the World Bank, indicates that, for countries in Africa, poverty continues to rise because anti-poverty policies fail to reduce poverty (PGP, 2016), a view shared by the literature on poverty reduction in Africa (Dagusta, 2007; McCloskey, 2015). It has been suggested that more comprehensive and coordinated methods could help anti-poverty programmes overcome some of the major challenges to alleviating global poverty (Ravallion, 2016). In line with this suggestion, the proposed research examines the potential of sustainable anti-poverty strategies through the triangulation of three research domains: multidimensional poverty, family functioning, and social justice theories.

The Difference Between PhD and DBA Explained

Being a graduate business school we are often asked what exactly is the difference between a PhD and a DBA degree or program. In general, the two degrees are typically considered equivalent from an academic rigor standpoint. They both must satisfy the requirement for originality. And both can be used for teaching purposes. However, there are some important distinctions that should be kept in mind.

Post-Doctoral Candidate Dr. Shaid Rasool

It is a pleasure for the Administration to introduce Dr. Shahid Rasool, a Post-Doctoral Fellow in Corporate Social Responsibility and Global Business Ethics. He holds a Ph.D. in Marketing from the University of Malaysia Sarawak as well as a Master of Science and MBA in Marketing from Mohammad Ali Jinnah University in Pakistan. He also […]

Research: An Examination of the Implementation of the Common Market Protocol In East Africa

The East African Community (EAC) marks one among many of the attempts of East African countries to unite. The contemplated research intends to analyze the hindrances to the CMP’s full adoption through theories of international trade, regional integration and economic growth. The ultimate goal of the contemplated research is to construct a new conceptual model or framework that better explains the implementation of the EAC Common market protocol.

Prof. Lutsenko Edits Book WIth Springer

Monarch Business School Switzerland is happy to announce that Prof. Anastasiia Lutsenko, Professor of Management, is a contributing editor on a new release with Springer. Her research focuses on the nexus of entrepreneurial orientation, learning orientation, and human resource management. She has also been a visiting researcher at York University (Canada) and is presently working on the innovation research project sponsored by the National Academy of Science of Ukraine.

Dr. Ashley Robinson Graduates With Distinction & Special Honor

It is with great pleasure that Monarch Business School Switzerland announces that Dr. Ashley Robinson has graduated the PhD program with great distinction. The announcement was recently made at the October convocation at the Rapperswil castle on Lake Zurich in Switzerland. Dr. Robinson’s dissertation focused on the relationship between global corporate culture and negotiation practices within the reinsurance industry. As a native Bermudian citizen working in the reinsurance industry the research topic is dear to her heart.

Professor Lutsenko Presents On Transformation At UNIT.city

Professor Lutsenko recently presented at UNIT.city on individual transformation, creativity, collaboration, team building and leadership. She used her recent research experience at Burning Man 2018 as a catalyst for the discussion. Professor Lutsenko’s research investigates how individual creativity through personal transformation can bring increased personal confidence, leadership, team building and breakthroughs at the group level. Her research centers around the I.T. industry but is applicable to all enterprises looking to adapt to uncertain conditions and capture performance benefits from personal transformation as applied to a management setting. Her research shows that by involving individuals in creative and transforming experience communication and innovation, both individual and team based, becomes more open and performance increases. We look forward to a series of research articles in the near future further developing and describing her research findings.

Research: Managing Stakeholder And Indigenous Interests In Regulatory Reviews And Decision Making

Construction of infrastructure megaprojects is a critical component of global economic growth and development (Cantú, 2017; Flyvbjerg, 2014). These large-scale, complex, multi-year developments include highways, railways, mining and hydroelectric facilities, oil and gas facilities and pipelines. Megaproject capital costs typically exceed $1 billion USD and are financed by corporations, governments or public-private partnerships (Delmon, 2017; Merrow, 2011). An example of megaproject development in Canada is the need for new energy pipelines to serve domestic and international markets. While Canada was recently hailed as an emerging “World Energy Superpower” there are industry, government, stakeholder and Indigenous concerns with the process, participation, pace and outcomes of pipeline regulatory reviews and decision making (Forrester, Howie, & Ross, 2015). This resulted in the loss of billions of dollars of Canadian private investment, tax revenues and economic development in the past decade. The contemplated research will review the literature on public-private interests, stakeholder management, social licence and decision making. A triangulated, mixed methods approach including content analysis and interviews will be used. The case study focuses on Canadian pipeline megaprojects proposed between 1997 and 2017 and will compare similar megaprojects in the United States and Mexico. The goal is to develop a conceptual framework or model to better describe how the management of stakeholder and Indigenous interests in the pipeline regulatory review process can lead to improved, collaborative, and more timely decision making.

Research: Intelligence Collection and Ethical Behavior in the Post 9/11 Era

The U.S. military and intelligence community practices exist within a business ethics framework of laws, official policies, and guidance that seeks to protect national interests and provide a scaffolding for individual intelligence agents through decision-making processes. Particularly in times of crisis, intelligence agents must make time-sensitive decisions that often hold ethical consequences. With rapid technological advances in the post-9/11 era, such as the advent and proliferation of drones and the institution of the PRISM program, operatives face new ethical and personal leadership challenges. Whistleblowers Edward Snowden and Chelsea Manning have become public examples of how the intersection of business ethics and crisis management can lead to personal leadership decisions which hold great consequence for national security and personal autonomy. The contemplated research examines such contemporary ethical issues through a triangulation of three research domains, being: business and personal ethics, crisis management, and congruency theory. The contemplated research seeks to uncover themes related to what happens at the intersection of these three research domains set in a technologically advancing intelligence and surveillance network through intelligence agent participatory survey data, interviews, and content analysis of U.S. intelligence and Department of Defense literature.