Research: Social Media Networks And Leadership Ethics In Healthcare

Social media has penetrated intrapersonal and professional communication, particularly among a younger generation of healthcare professionals and patients who have grown up in the digital age of communication. Social media tools provide a unique set of opportunities in healthcare, but with these new opportunities come a number of potential challenges. As health leaders navigate the increasingly complex world of social media, concerns have arisen regarding questions of ethics and professionalism and how the use of social media fits within the social contract between the medical profession and society. This article describes the changing parameters of professional conduct in digital environments and proposes a set of considerations and recommendations for health leaders to navigate this new frontier.

Research: Multilateral Negotiations: The Emerging Negotiating Model In The International Labour Organization

The negotiating model or framework adopted at the formation of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) in 1919 placed the representatives of workers and employers on an equal footing with government representatives in decision making (Maupain 2013). The tripartite arrangement makes the ILO a unique agency within the United Nations system (Simpson, 1994). However, the configuration of the government group evolved during and after the cold war resulting in complex multi- layers of negotiating units (Newman et al, 2006; Muldoon et al; 2010; Hampson & Heinbecker 2011). Furthermore, there are issues around the “paper” balance of power between governments and social partners in the negotiation processes let alone the representativeness of those that negotiate on behalf of the workers and employers (Thomas, 1996; Muldoon et al, 2010; Standing, 2010). The contemplated research will explore and analyse the inter-actor relationships and the attributes of the negotiating model or framework in the ILO

Research: Workforce Engagement of Generation Z

Managers have to ensure the engagement of four different generational groups as part of the workforce. The conflict between generations and its negative impact on workforce productivity, company progress and overall advancement has long been acknowledged. The millennial problem, which refers to the set of ideas that the individuals born between 1975 and 2000 are ill-fit for the work environment, is correlated with an ambiguity surrounding Generation Z; There is a lack of information about the generational groups born after Millienials, from 1995 to 2009. Therefore, ensuring an operationally functional work environment is believed to be problematic and difficult. The contemplated research intends to examine the values, work condition inclinations and preferred managerial style of Generation Z employees.

MBA Candidate Jenny Tran’s Research Paper Accepted For Publication At The DSI 50th Annual Conference in New Orleans

It is a pleasure for Monarch to announce that a recent research paper by MBA Candidate Jenny Tran entitled: “Achieving Blue Ocean Strategy by Operations Management” has been accepted for publication in the Proceedings of the Decision Sciences Institute 50th Annual Conference for 2019 at New Orleans in November. Ms. Tran researched her paper under the watchful direction of Dr. Barin Nag, Professor of Operations Management at Monarch. We wish Ms. Tran the very best in presenting her paper and we are proud of her accomplishment.

Research: Programme Management Strategies For Improved Delivery Of Major Construction Activities

In the current business climate with aggressive competition and increasing demands for improved performance and profits, sustainable growth strategies are key to any successful programme delivery. Successful programmes invariably occur as a result of effective and strong leadership by those who truly understand the programme environment as well as the challenges and the opportunities that are created. A programme is defined as a temporary, flexible organisation created to coordinate, direct and oversee the implementation of a set of related projects and activities in order to deliver outcomes and benefits related to the strategic objectives of the organisation. Programmes are generally about delivering change with a series of outcomes and these are invariably interlinked. The contemplated research examines programme management strategies for improved delivery of major construction activities of large projects in both Europe and the Middle Eastern regions. This is achieved through a triangulation of three research domains, namely: sustainability theory, strategy in programme management theory and stakeholder management theory. The contemplated research seeks to formulate a new model or framework that defines programme management strategies for the delivering of major construction activities.

Research: Equipping Conservation Managers For An Industry In Crisis: Evidence From South Africa

The escalation of illegal poaching and wildlife trafficking over the last decade has placed the conservation industry in crises. Conservation managers find themselves with a new professional landscape to navigate where daily challenges lie far outside their existing skill set. As a result, there is a need to understand the disparity between what conservation managers have been prepared for and what they now face in order to inform training and capacity building interventions. Using the South African conservation industry as a case study, the research will address this Praxis Gap by gaining a deeper understanding of the nexus within the academic literature; investigating the key performance outputs and competence shortfalls experienced by protected area managers and developing a new framework or model that may identify the most important competencies required by contemporary protected area managers in the South African conservation industry.

Research: Anti-Poverty Strategies: An Investigation of Northern Nigeria

Poverty and poverty reduction are prominent topics of discussion at international development meetings. Despite the existence of both private and public initiatives to combat it, over 1 billion people still live in extreme poverty, about half of whom are in sub-Saharan African countries (MDG, 2015). Poverty Global Practice, a poverty policy monitoring and evaluation unit of the World Bank, indicates that, for countries in Africa, poverty continues to rise because anti-poverty policies fail to reduce poverty (PGP, 2016), a view shared by the literature on poverty reduction in Africa (Dagusta, 2007; McCloskey, 2015). It has been suggested that more comprehensive and coordinated methods could help anti-poverty programmes overcome some of the major challenges to alleviating global poverty (Ravallion, 2016). In line with this suggestion, the proposed research examines the potential of sustainable anti-poverty strategies through the triangulation of three research domains: multidimensional poverty, family functioning, and social justice theories.