Research: Anti-Poverty Strategies: An Investigation of Northern Nigeria

Poverty and poverty reduction are prominent topics of discussion at international development meetings. Despite the existence of both private and public initiatives to combat it, over 1 billion people still live in extreme poverty, about half of whom are in sub-Saharan African countries (MDG, 2015). Poverty Global Practice, a poverty policy monitoring and evaluation unit of the World Bank, indicates that, for countries in Africa, poverty continues to rise because anti-poverty policies fail to reduce poverty (PGP, 2016), a view shared by the literature on poverty reduction in Africa (Dagusta, 2007; McCloskey, 2015). It has been suggested that more comprehensive and coordinated methods could help anti-poverty programmes overcome some of the major challenges to alleviating global poverty (Ravallion, 2016). In line with this suggestion, the proposed research examines the potential of sustainable anti-poverty strategies through the triangulation of three research domains: multidimensional poverty, family functioning, and social justice theories.

Richard van Ostende Publishes China Book

Organizations seeking expansion for their operations in China have a number of options to facilitate business development. Both domestic and foreign invested companies consider branch offices to be a popular investment vehicle for fast expansion in China due to their comparable low incorporation requirements including no capital requirements and easy maintenance, but allow for a formal representation. The information in this publication is not exhaustive, but aims to provide entrepreneurs with an in-depth understanding of the purposes China based branch offices serve the advantages and limitations of the different types of branch offices and set-up of the administrative organization.

Dr. Ashley Robinson Graduates With Distinction & Special Honor

It is with great pleasure that Monarch Business School Switzerland announces that Dr. Ashley Robinson has graduated the PhD program with great distinction. The announcement was recently made at the October convocation at the Rapperswil castle on Lake Zurich in Switzerland. Dr. Robinson’s dissertation focused on the relationship between global corporate culture and negotiation practices within the reinsurance industry. As a native Bermudian citizen working in the reinsurance industry the research topic is dear to her heart.

Research: Managing Stakeholder And Indigenous Interests In Regulatory Reviews And Decision Making

Construction of infrastructure megaprojects is a critical component of global economic growth and development (Cantú, 2017; Flyvbjerg, 2014). These large-scale, complex, multi-year developments include highways, railways, mining and hydroelectric facilities, oil and gas facilities and pipelines. Megaproject capital costs typically exceed $1 billion USD and are financed by corporations, governments or public-private partnerships (Delmon, 2017; Merrow, 2011). An example of megaproject development in Canada is the need for new energy pipelines to serve domestic and international markets. While Canada was recently hailed as an emerging “World Energy Superpower” there are industry, government, stakeholder and Indigenous concerns with the process, participation, pace and outcomes of pipeline regulatory reviews and decision making (Forrester, Howie, & Ross, 2015). This resulted in the loss of billions of dollars of Canadian private investment, tax revenues and economic development in the past decade. The contemplated research will review the literature on public-private interests, stakeholder management, social licence and decision making. A triangulated, mixed methods approach including content analysis and interviews will be used. The case study focuses on Canadian pipeline megaprojects proposed between 1997 and 2017 and will compare similar megaprojects in the United States and Mexico. The goal is to develop a conceptual framework or model to better describe how the management of stakeholder and Indigenous interests in the pipeline regulatory review process can lead to improved, collaborative, and more timely decision making.

Research: Intelligence Collection and Ethical Behavior in the Post 9/11 Era

The U.S. military and intelligence community practices exist within a business ethics framework of laws, official policies, and guidance that seeks to protect national interests and provide a scaffolding for individual intelligence agents through decision-making processes. Particularly in times of crisis, intelligence agents must make time-sensitive decisions that often hold ethical consequences. With rapid technological advances in the post-9/11 era, such as the advent and proliferation of drones and the institution of the PRISM program, operatives face new ethical and personal leadership challenges. Whistleblowers Edward Snowden and Chelsea Manning have become public examples of how the intersection of business ethics and crisis management can lead to personal leadership decisions which hold great consequence for national security and personal autonomy. The contemplated research examines such contemporary ethical issues through a triangulation of three research domains, being: business and personal ethics, crisis management, and congruency theory. The contemplated research seeks to uncover themes related to what happens at the intersection of these three research domains set in a technologically advancing intelligence and surveillance network through intelligence agent participatory survey data, interviews, and content analysis of U.S. intelligence and Department of Defense literature.

April-2018 Doctoral Workshop In Pretoria Great Success

Monarch Business School is happy to announce that the April Doctoral workshop recently held in Pretoria, South Africa was a great success. The purpose of the workshops is to give students the opportunity to present their research in front of their peers and faculty members. The research method is deconstructed and reconstructed in order to improve upon the work. The debates between concerning the methodology used are lively and students themselves assist each other a great deal in improving everyone’s work.

Research: Foreign Direct Investment Into China: Determinants Of The Strategic Decision-Making Process

The historically high Foreign Direct Investment inflows into China has been one of the principal drivers of economic growth, developing China into the world’s second largest economy by nominal Gross Domestic Product (Chung & Bruton, 2008; Worldbank, 2017). The Chinese business context, which is considered challenging by investing European companies, is undergoing structural reform, complicating the determination to perform FDI (EKN, 2016; EU CoC, 2016). The contemplated research examines the above through an analysis of the seminal literature from Strategic Decision-Making Theory, Market Entry Theory and Foreign Direct Investment Theory. An attempt to construct a new conceptual model or framework that better integrates theory with praxis is the ultimate goal of the research. In particular, the research will examine the impact of determinants of the strategic decision-making process on market entry by Dutch companies through a triangulation research approach including: a literature review, content analysis of government policy and interviewing of selected individuals from Dutch companies’, (semi-)government, China-based Chambers of Commerce.

Research: Entrepreneurship Development Centres In Nigerian Polytechnics: A Case Study Of Youth Development

Youth unemployment is a global phenomenon that presents a threat to world peace (Cray et al., 2011). In 2014 the unemployment rate in Nigeria for youth averaged 17.5% (WB, 2016). In 2006, in response to the problem of youth unemployment, the Nigerian government mandated that all polytechnics in the federation establish the CED to impart entrepreneurship skills and knowledge to students for self-reliance. Entrepreneurship is considered a pivotal element of economic growth and development; and through the creation of SMEs, employment opportunities are created (Chidiebere, Iloanya, & Udunze, 2014). The contemplated research will examine measures through the analysis of theories on entrepreneurship, peace, social justice, poverty reduction and Austrian economics. A new conceptual model or framework that better integrates theory with praxis will be constructed. The research will investigate the effectiveness of entrepreneurship development centres in Nigerian polytechnics, specifically, their potential to reduce youth unemployment rates in the country.

Research: The Delivery of Public-Private Partnership Projects: A Study of the Ghanaian Construction Industry

Public private partnerships have been adopted in the Ghanaian economic development agenda as a viable solution to meet the country’s infrastructure needs since 2000. The adoption has become significant in the reality of the shortage of government financial resources coupled with public sector inefficiencies. Following this, Ghana has made several attempts to practically reap the […]