Research

Dr. Keller Paper Wins Two Awards At The 32nd Global Conference on Business And Finance in Hawaii

Monarch Business School Switzerland is proud to announce that Dr. Gary Keller, Professor of Management, has presented a paper entitled, “Examining if Grading Bias Exists in a Professor of Business’ Courses – A Three-Year Analysis” at the Global Conference on Business and Finance (GCBF), Hawaii, USA. Proceedings, ISSN 1941-9589 (online). The paper won 2 awards including: Best in Session Award
and Outstanding Research Award.

Dr. Iqbal Publishes Article On African Trade Blocks

This study employs the gravity model to estimate the extent of the contribution of six African trade blocs to the global economy using the gravity model spanning from 1980 to 2018. The gravity equation that models the export contributions of the six selected African RECs to the global export is estimated. The estimated gravity model reveals that the long run estimations show that the coefficient estimate for SACU and ECCAS are insignificant in the long run while SACU, EAC and ECCAS as RECs, have insignificant contribution to export in the short run.

Research: Promoting Sustainable Growth Through Digital Nation Branding

Business Strategy plays a major role in most companies, particularly in developed and mature countries. Studies show that a formal strategy can contribute to organizational effectiveness and competitive advantage. In the last few years, the United Kingdom has faced a protracted and slow growth, political uncertainty and inefficiencies due to poor management. As a result, similar mature markets have seen productivity and efficiency surpass that of the UK. Between 2017 and 2019, the UK economy lost 185 billion GBP per year due to poor management and resulting ill health. The UK also fell 14% behind similar countries in the G7 on productivity (Francke, 2017). The economic environment does not favour businesses with little or no strategic direction.

Research: Sustainable Rural Poverty Alleviation Programs: A Case Study Of Uganda

The poverty crisis is global with some 689 million people classified as poor, and living on incomes of less than $1.9 a day (The Human Development Report, 2020). Uganda has seen strong economic growth rates over the past decade averaging 5.4% GPD per year, along with a decrease in poverty. Nevertheless, the gains in poverty reduction have not been fairly distributed. This has made some scholars doubt the substantial decline in poverty (Daniels & Amp; Minot, 2014). Despite Uganda’s progress in reducing poverty since 1992, there have also been significant movements both into and out of poverty, and a sizeable minority of households have been persistently poor.

Research: Foreign Direct Investment In South Africa: A Comparative Analysis Of Successful Country Level Programs For The Manufacturing Sector

Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) is widely regarded as one of the engines for social economic growth, employment, skills and technology transfers. More specifically, Mallampally & Sauvent (1999) highlight that FDI can make a considerable contribution to the economic progress of developing countries. A large number of developing countries lack significant domestic savings in order to achieve their internal investment goals, therefore FDI appears to provide a means for this requirement.

Research: Reflecting on the Cone (2010) Corporate Citizenship Spectrum as a Framework for Research Relating to Corporate Partnerships in Higher Education

Participation by corporations in supporting higher education remains highly visible and controversial for academicians and practitioners. While best practices can be found, many gray areas exist in the actions and motivations for corporate citizenship behavior in relation to higher education. This paper reflects on the usefulness of the Cone (2010) corporate citizenship spectrum used in Clevenger’s (2014) organizational analysis case study, which examines corporate citizenship through the inter-organizational relationships between a public U.S. doctoral research university and six of its corporate partners.

Article: Charity, Global Income Inequality, Islam, Trickle-Down Economics, Zakat

Participation by corporations in supporting higher education remains highly visible and controversial for academicians and practitioners. While best practices can be found, many gray areas exist in the actions and motivations for corporate citizenship behavior in relation to higher education. This paper reflects on the usefulness of the Cone (2010) corporate citizenship spectrum used in Clevenger’s (2014) organizational analysis case study, which examines corporate citizenship through the inter-organizational relationships between a public U.S. doctoral research university and six of its corporate partners.

TextBook: Applications of Neuroscience to Improve Wellbeing in Organizational Life

The application of neuroscience toward well-being in organizational life has been an emerging field of research over the last few decades and Branchi and Alleva (2006) proposes that these protocols are developing as a specific domain within the fields of management science, organizational behavior, human resource management, and related areas. According to Bandura (1991) the key focus should be understanding the application of brain-based well-being systems and offering tools for healthy behavior change within the organizational context. Lupien SJ, Maheu F, Tu M, et al. (2007) suggests that understanding how to effectively apply the findings from neuroscience may lead to positive neurophysiological and psycho-social health benefits. To enhance health and well-being in organizations, learning from neuro-science should be applied practically (Parsons, 2019) as this approach has shown to sustain health and improve well-being at work.